Thursday, November 29, 2012

News Release - Just Published - The Book of Now


Just Published!

The Book of Now: 
Poetry for the Rising Tide

edited by Leah Shelleda

It is an honor to be the publisher of The Book of Now: Poetry for the Rising Tide. To Anita Endrezze, Crystal Good, Dunya Mikhail, Frances Hatfield, Jane Downs, Leah Shelleda, and Naomi Ruth Lowinsky, I would like to express my sincere gratitude, for allowing Fisher King Press to publish poets of such venerated caliber. It is my hope that your mighty voices encompass the entire world and your messages reach and touch the hearts of humanity as a whole. It is my hope that your most worthy offerings are genuinely received and deeply understood.
-- Mel Mathews, Publisher, Fisher King Press

Seven lyrical women poets, each accompanied by a study of their work, navigate our contemporary world. They travel to the depths of the psyche, experience exile, rhapsodize on the beauty of our planet, lament loss and celebrate renewal. These poets write courageously on what threatens us: climate change, war, mountain-top removal, loss of species, environmental damage, the scourge of cancer. They are witnesses, ‘Couriers’ who bring us their visions. As the tide rises they reach out to us in deeply personal and clear voices, each providing a unique experience in contemporary poetry.

The Book of Now: Poetry for the Rising Tide
* Paperback: 110 pages
* Publisher: il piccolo editions; First edition (Nov 1, 2012)
* Language: English
* ISBN-10: 192671590X
* ISBN-13: 978-1926715902

Fisher King Press publishes an eclectic mix of worthy books including 
Jungian Psychological Perspectives, Cutting-Edge Fiction, Poetry, 
and a growing list of alternative titles. 

Thursday, November 1, 2012

News Release: Hermes, Ecopsychology, Complexity Theory

Just Published—Now Shipping!

Hermes, Ecopsychology, Complexity Theory: 
The Dairy Farmer's Guide to the Universe Volume III
by Dennis L. Merritt


“Who ever does not shy away from dangers of the most profound depths and the newest pathways, which Hermes is always prepared to open, may follow and reach, whether as scholar, commentator, or philosopher, a greater find and a more certain possession.”  —Karl Kerenyi

An exegesis of the myth of Hermes stealing Apollo’s cattle and the story of Hephaestus trapping Aphrodite and Ares in the act are used in The Dairy Farmer’s Guide to the Universe Volume III to set a mythic foundation for Jungian ecopsychology. Hermes, Ecopsychology, and Complexity Theory illustrates Hermes as the archetypal link to our bodies, sexuality, the phallus, the feminine, and the earth. Hermes’ wand is presented as a symbol for ecopsychology. The appendices of this volume develop the argument for the application of complexity theory to key Jungian concepts, displacing classical Jungian constructs problematic to the scientific and academic community. Hermes is described as the god of ecopsychology and complexity theory.

The front cover image is from a photo taken by the author of detail on an Attic Greek calyx krater by Euxitheos (potter) and Euphronios (painter) ca. 515 BCE. The gap between the horn-like extensions atop Hermes’ staff highlight his domain—the exchange and interactive field between things, as between people, consciousness and the unconscious, body and mind, and humans and nature.


Hermes, Ecopsychology, and Complexity Theory
The Dairy Farmer's Guide to the Universe Volume III
ISBN 978-1-926715-44-5
6 x 9
228 pages
Index, Bibliography
Publication Date November 1, 2012

DENNIS L. MERRITT, Ph.D., is a Jungian psychoanalyst and ecopsychologist in private practice in Madison and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. A Diplomate of the C.G. Jung Institute of Analytical Psychology, Zurich, Switzerland, he also holds the following degrees: M.A. Humanistic Psychology-Clinical, Sonoma State University, California, Ph.D. Insect Pathology, University of California-Berkeley, M.S. and B.S. in Entomology, University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has participated in Lakota Sioux ceremonies for over twenty-five years which have strongly influenced his worldview.

Saturday, October 13, 2012

MySpace—Few years later

Wendy is a friend I met online in 2006 when by fluke I was led to open a MySpace account—a social network that later became more than just—a social network. More on this later . . .

Tonight, I also met Earl, her husband of 30 years? He bought dinner. It turned out to be a very lovely evening. I came home—my heart spoke . . .

Wendy and Patty

'twas a rainy Saturday night
two women and a nice looking man
shared a table by the fire place
at Faloney's
Ancaster's steak and smoke house

She's my friend Wendy
she calls me Patty
the nice man is Wendy's Earl
he likes his coffee
he builds litter box
out of fluffy grass

two women and a man
who woulda' thought
he may even had some fun
we talked about Facebook
MySpace and even books

My grilled salmon was perfect
Wendy's grilled basa looked great
Earl's pulled chicken
dripping sauce
invading the bed of fries
would it be okay
to reach over
for the closest fry?
I wondered.

we talked
we ate
we drank
then it was late
but no, wait!
kodak moment

Earl aims and shoot
Wendy examines
No! retake
again…again…again
we're not done yet
out in the cold
shoot…another
Yes! It was perfect
made it to FB profile page

Thank you Wendy
Thank you Earl
the dinner was lovely
the company exquisite
let's do this again
soon, and not a year later!


Saturday, October 13, 2012
Faloney's Steak and Smoke House, Ancaster

Friday, October 12, 2012

Paul Watsky on DPA Online Book Club

listen
AUDIO: Telling the Difference: Where Poetry and Jungian Psychology Converge
Bonnie Bright speaks with Poet and Jungian Analyst, Paul Watsky, as he offers up the story of how he was led to each career, and shares his work that opens the door into the deep poetic leanings of soul. Telling the Difference is the only book of poetry (featured in the month of October) in the 2012 free online Depth Psychology Alliance Book Club.

"To quote Norman O. Brown quoting Euripedes, "God made an opening for the unexpected," and at long last we have what many of us have greatly desired: a collection of poems by Paul Watsky.

"Paul Watsky's is a singular voice in contemporary poetry, with a range that encompasses the wry, the mordant, the laugh-out-loud funny and the deeply moving, often within the same poem." -Charles Martin
depth psychology book club authorOut of the Shadows Depth Psychology book club
Paul Watsky is the author of the poetry collection Telling The Difference grew up in New York City and began writing poetry during high school. He now lives and works in San Francisco, where he earns his living as a Jungian analyst. 

He has published three chapbooks, "More Questions Than Answers" (tel-let 2001) "Sea Side" (tel-let 2003), and "Extra Innings," (2010, online at Interpoezia), cotranslated with Emiko Miyashita Santoka (Tokyo, PIE Books, 2006), and has poems in various journals, including Poetry Flash, The Cream City Review, onthebus, The Asheville Poetry Review, The Pinch, Natural Bridge, The Alabama Review, and forthcoming in Many Mountains Moving.

Monday, October 1, 2012

A Weekend in Los Angeles with Erel Shalit


The C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles presents:

Friday, October 5; 7:30-9:30 pm
Saturday, October 6; 10:00 am-3:00 pm

Click to Register for this special event!


“To speak of a general, human life cycle,” says Daniel Levinson, “is to propose that the journey from birth to old age follows an underlying, universal pattern on which there are endless cultural and individual variations.” In his essay “The Stages of Life” Jung discusses “the problems connected with the stages of life,” claiming problem to be the kernel of culture and consciousness. On our journey through the stages of our life, we encounter the archetypal essence of each phase and are challenged by the essence of meaning that we are requested to deal with on our journey. The lecture will explore crucial archetypal images of the journey and the stages of life, and tell some of the stories.

Dr. Erel Shalit is a Jungian psychoanalyst practicing in Ra’anana, Israel. He is Founding Director of the Jungian Psychotherapy Program at Bar Ilan University. A training and supervising analyst, and past President of the Israel Society of Analytical Psychology, Dr. Shalit also served as Director of the Shamai Davidson Community Mental Health Clinic at the Shalvata Psychiatric Center in Israel. His most recent books include The Cycle of Life: Themes and Tales of the JourneyRequiem: A Tale of Exile and Return; and Enemy, Cripple, Beggar: Shadows in the Hero’s Path. In addition Dr Shalit's work has appeared in numerous books and journals. He wrote the chapter on Jerusalem in Tom Singer (ed.), Psyche and the City. He is on the editorial board of Quadrant. With Nancy Furlotti, he is editing a forthcoming volume on The Dream and its Amplification.
Fisher King Press publishes an eclectic mix of worthy books including 
Jungian Psychological Perspectives, Cutting-Edge Fiction, Poetry, 
and a growing list of alternative titles. 

Monday, September 24, 2012

Truchas Peaks Place



Truchas Peaks Place, home of the Truchas Peaks Writers Conferences, is nestled high in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, with panoramic views of the Truchas Peaks, the Jemez Mountains, and the Pedernal, made famous by Georgia O’Keeffe’s paintings. At the midway point between Santa Fe and Taos, Truchas Peaks Place is easily accessible from either city, yet affords the peacefulness and pristine natural surroundings of a secluded retreat. Part of Spanish colonial village, Truchas, settled in 1754 is now a vibrant community of locals, artists, and craftspeople. Truchas is a place to re-calibrate. To escape stress, city noise, traffic, and everyday worries. To paint, read, walk, think, and spend time with loved ones.

Truchas Peaks Place houses the Donald Kalsched – Robin van Loben Sels 10,000-volume library and has more than enough space to allow group members to undertake individual work undisturbed, yet boasts excellent facilities for shared sessions.

Draft your next short story. Follow in the footsteps of the many great artists, past and contemporary, who have chosen North Central New Mexico as their base for its inspirational mix of peacefulness and majesty—Truchas is a favorite of poets and writers. Sit on the porch at sunset and watch the sun paint the mountains red. The landscape surrounding Truchas would inspire a painter at any skill level to new heights. Why not put together a painting workshop or retreat that includes the annual High Road Art Tour—or your own version of it? The rich culture and its creative output of sculpture, paintings, photography, pottery, weaving, jewelry, and crafts are sure to inspire you.

Explore the regional cuisine, hands-on style. Try your hand at cooking green chile stew with fresh produce from the farmer’s market. The gourmet kitchen at Truchas is the ideal setting for a food-lovers’ retreat, a fine cooking workshop, or simply a meal your family will never forget.

Listen to the yipping of the coyotes at dawn. The birds are not the only wild things greeting the stunning morning scenery of North Central New Mexico—though you will find plenty to delight over if bird-watching is a passion of yours. New Mexico boasts one of the richest lists of resident birds in the nation; around 500 all told. But songbirds share the region with many other animals, from muskrats and turtles to coyotes, deer, and bighorn sheep.


Stunning Natural Beauty, Luxury Accommodations, Meeting and Event Rooms, Wireless Internet . . . Truchas Peaks Place is a Northern New Mexico Retreat & Conference Center that is ideal for hosting a seminar, group retreat, small conference, family reunion? Are you looking for a unique venue to gather your family or a group of friends? Planning a workshop, an off-site company retreat, or a small wedding? Truchas Peaks Place is the perfect facility for small to mid-size groups, offering exquisite tranquility, luxury bedrooms, meeting rooms, an extensive library, a full-service kitchen for self-catering, and an abundance of possibilities for exploration.


Truchas Peaks Place, 1671 State Road 76, P.O. Box 471, Truchas, NM 87578
1-866-561-1671

Friday, September 21, 2012

Thomas Moore on Gathering the Light





by V. Walter Odajnyk

The following is Thomas Moore's Foreword to Gathering the Light:

In its basic forms meditation is simply something that human beings do. We stop before a beautiful sunset and take it in as a deep aesthetic experience. We hear bad news and stop and think through all its implications and feel its impact on our emotions. We walk in a forest and can’t help but get quiet to be part of the natural world around us. We think through our problems and wonder about our future and consider the past.

Spiritual traditions offer ways to make these simple, primal ways of meditating more formal and more effective. More sophisticated ways of meditating take us deep and have an even greater impact on our emotions, worldview and sense of self. They calm us not just by quieting the body and the mind, but by cleansing the impurities of our psychological and spiritual condition, a point made by that well-known champion of meditation and the dark night of the soul, John of the Cross.

If you have read C. G. Jung’s memoir Memories, Dreams, Reflections, you will have eavesdropped on a remarkable man who, perhaps more than any other 20th century person, used many methods, internal and external, to explore his soul. Many readers are surprised to find what they thought was an autobiography to be slight on facts and heavy with internal images and experiences. Jung explored and mapped and named the inhabitants of the inner world with a ferocity of imagination rarely seen. All the while, he connected his discoveries and inventions to the discipline of psychology and to the religious, occult and spiritual traditions of the world.

So it makes sense to relate our efforts to meditate with Jung’s writings, especially with his notions of Self, his alchemical studies and his special method of active imagination. Having not worked this idea through for myself, after studying Jung intensely for many years, I was surprised and happy to see it done so enthusiastically and intelligently in this remarkable book by Walter Odajnyk.

When contemporary psychology confronts meditation, it often moves in a reductive direction, like telling us that certain parts of the brain are lighting up when a person enters deep focus. But Jung was not your typical psychologist. He had a vast and detailed interest in religious and spiritual issues and for the most part didn’t reduce the spiritual to the psychological. Or, if he did come close to it on occasion, generally he tried to elevate psychology through an enthusiastic appreciation of religion and opened up the meaning of religious rites and imagery with his own rich brand of psychologizing. As a former member of a Catholic religious order, I found his writings on the Mass and on the Virgin Mary enlightening and enriching.

This book also makes interesting comparisons between psychotherapy and transcendent forms of meditation. There is much to learn here about the two processes, one sorting out the psyche and the other reaching into transpersonal realms. In my own favored language, I would say that there is a spiritual form of meditating that takes us beyond ourselves and a soul meditating that remains close to life and personality, using art, images, ritual and nature as aids to contemplation.

Jung tells a fascinating story of his discovery of alchemy and its usefulness to his own life and to his work. In the first relevant dream he found himself in a wing of his house he didn’t know existed. It contained a library of esoteric books. Then he found himself locked up in the 17th century, the time when European alchemy flourished. I find it an exciting and fruitful idea to use alchemy as the basis for a special kind of meditation, and you have the fundamentals in this book.

Alchemy provides us with particular images for the materials, processes, and phases of soul work. Jung began with the Secret of the Golden Flower, and so it’s appropriate that it is the focus of this book. Today especially, a time of thorough materialism in science and psychology, we have to extract the soul from the many literal and purely physical ideas we have about human life. You might say that a primary purpose of meditation is to recover our souls from being lost and stuck and covered over with ideas that are too thick for the subtleties of soul work.

Most people who know a little about Jung are familiar with the notion of the psychological complex and the archetype. These are essential elements in a Jungian therapy that helps a person get freed from the dominance of a particular complex or archetype. Professor Odajnyk makes the important point that meditation is an effective way to contact the complexes and to reach the archetypal level of experience. I can imagine it having a useful role in the therapeutic analysis of the psyche. I might even go so far as to say that at times therapy itself is a kind of meditation. Dream work, for instance, takes you deep into reflection on images that are full of interest and relevance because they shed so much light on the underworld of our daily experience.

I welcome the re-appearance of this book because generally people focus on the technical aspects of meditating and not so much on the processes and fantasies of the psyche that are involved. I wouldn’t recommend a purely Jungian style of meditating, but Jungian ideas can enrich the experience and importantly bring the deep psyche into the picture. Sometimes people become so focused on their spiritual progress that they neglect the deep soul.
As you read this subtle, carefully thought-out book, you might draw simple lessons for yourself that you can apply to your meditations. You might expand your very notion of what meditation is and how to go about it. In a more general sense, you might begin to reconcile soul and spirit in your life, achieving one of the primary goals of alchemy. Imagine this book lying open in a warm, shadowy and mysterious laboratory of the soul. It offers you guidance and a few recipes for becoming a deeper and more soulful person.

You have just read Thomas Moore's Foreword to V. Walter Odajnyk's
Gathering the Light: A Jungian View of Meditation.

About the Author
V. Walter Odajnyk, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst, and serves as a Core Faculty member and is the Research Coordinator for Pacifica Graduate Institute's Mythological Studies Program.
Fisher King Press publishes an eclectic mix of worthy books including Jungian Psychological Perspectives, Cutting-Edge Fiction, and a growing list of alternative titles.
    • International Shipping.
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    Saturday, August 18, 2012

    A Magical Place Where Minds Meet!

    Opus House
    Opus House is a comfortable adobe home near the old Spanish village of Truchas in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Northern New Mexico. Sitting at 8300 feet elevation, 45 minutes from Santa Fe on the High Road to Taos, Opus House is offered to selected individuals of all callings and backgrounds as a place of solitude and creative work. It is seen as a place to be for a week or so to concentrate on a chosen creative process.

    For those interested in exploring this offering, contact:
    Opus House, 1671 State Road 76, P.O. Box 471, Truchas, NM 87578


    A number of Fisher King Press authors have spent time at Opus House and Truchas Peaks Place. Patricia Damery and Naomi Ruth Lowinsky wrote the preface, the section introductions, and flowed together the essays that comprised Marked By Fire: Stories of the Jungian Way. Leah Shelleda, author of After the Jug Was Broken occasionally retreats to Opus House. Mel Mathews has completed a number of Fisher King Press titles while hiding away at this sacred place.

    Truchas is nestled high in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, with panoramic views of the Truchas Peaks, the Jemez Mountains, and the Pedernal, made famous by Georgia O’Keeffe’s paintings. At the midway point between Santa Fe and Taos, Truchas Peaks Place is easily accessible from either city, yet affords the peacefulness and pristine natural surroundings of a secluded retreat. Part of Spanish colonial village, Truchas, settled in 1754 is now a vibrant community of locals, artists, and craftspeople. Truchas is a place to re-calibrate. To escape stress, city noise, traffic, and everyday worries. To paint, read, walk, think, and spend time with loved ones.

    Truchas Peaks Place houses the Donald Kalsched – Robin van Loben Sels 10,000-volume library and has more than enough space to allow group members to undertake individual work undisturbed, yet boasts excellent facilities for shared sessions.

    Draft your next short story. Follow in the footsteps of the many great artists, past and contemporary, who have chosen North Central New Mexico as their base for its inspirational mix of peacefulness and majesty—Truchas is a favorite of poets and writers. Sit on the porch at sunset and watch the sun paint the mountains red. The landscape surrounding Truchas would inspire a painter at any skill level to new heights. Why not put together a painting workshop or retreat that includes the annual High Road Art Tour—or your own version of it? The rich culture and its creative output of sculpture, paintings, photography, pottery, weaving, jewelry, and crafts are sure to inspire you.

    Explore the regional cuisine, hands-on style. Try your hand at cooking green chile stew with fresh produce from the farmer’s market. The gourmet kitchen at Truchas is the ideal setting for a food-lovers’ retreat, a fine cooking workshop, or simply a meal your family will never forget.

    Listen to the yipping of the coyotes at dawn. The birds are not the only wild things greeting the stunning morning scenery of North Central New Mexico—though you will find plenty to delight over if bird-watching is a passion of yours. New Mexico boasts one of the richest lists of resident birds in the nation; around 500 all told. But songbirds share the region with many other animals, from muskrats and turtles to coyotes, deer, and bighorn sheep.


    Stunning Natural Beauty, Luxury Accommodations, Meeting & Event Rooms, Wireless Internet . . . Truchas Peaks Place is a Northern New Mexico Retreat & Conference Center that is ideal for hosting a seminar, group retreat, small conference, family reunion? Are you looking for a unique venue to gather your family or a group of friends? Planning a workshop, an off-site company retreat, or a small wedding? Truchas Peaks Place is the perfect facility for small to mid-size groups, offering exquisite tranquility, luxury bedrooms, meeting rooms, an extensive library, a full-service kitchen for self-catering, and an abundance of possibilities for exploration.


    Truchas Peaks Place, 1671 State Road 76, P.O. Box 471, Truchas, NM 87578
    1-866-561-1671

    Monday, July 16, 2012

    Tantra & Erotic Trance Volume I & II

    News Release


    Fisher King Press to publish John Ryan Haule's Tantra & Erotic Trance in two volumes.

    Tantra & Erotic Trance
    Volume One - Outer Work

    A recurring metaphor Tantra & Erotic Trance is that of the ladder of mystical ascent, sometimes called the “diamond” ladder, evoking the Tibetan concept of dorje and the Hindu lingam but especially the diamond body of Buddhism.  An ascent is described, beginning in the very first chapters where controversies about sex lead to the conclusion that human sexuality has both a horizontal meaning as the foundation of the nuclear family in a stable society and a vertical meaning as the engine of consciousness change in Tantra.

    We embark on the vertical path only by developing a new relationship with our body, in fact reversing some of the assumptions most of us take for granted.  This first volume, “Outer Work,” describes the influence our body can have on our consciousness, beginning with a new valuation of orgasm and its role in human sexuality.  We also learn that being separated from our partner can be no less important than being together.  Finally, Tantra takes us into conflict with the values of society at large and recommends an heroic stance in which we court the most disturbing and overwhelming emotions in a spirit of equanimity.  The first volume ends with the reforms of the great tenth century devotee of Shiva, Abhinavagupta, who urged his disciples to turn their attention away from the outer forms of their practices and to attend instead to the changes occurring in their consciousness.

    Abhinavagupta made the essential mystical move recognized in every religious tradition:  that we must learn to reverse our attention, away from the deity or sacred object before us to the effects such beings cause in our awareness.  His contribution, then, becomes the foundation for Volume Two, “Inner Work.”

    Tantra & Erotic Trance
    ISBN 978-0-9776076-8-6
    9.25 x 7.5 x .75
    Est. 225 pages
    Index, Bibliography
    Publication Date November 15, 2012

    * * * * *

    Tantra & Erotic Trance
    Volume Two - Inner Work

    In Volume One of this study, “Outer Work,” we described managing our orgasmic response so as to cultivate “erotic trance,” the altered state of consciousness that is the foundation of all Tantric activity;  and we used it to climb the “diamond ladder” of mystical ascent to a rung characterized by the management of overwhelming emotions.

    Now in Volume Two, “Inner Work,” we turn our attention away from “outer” goals having to do with our physiology and our relation to society at large and its prescriptions, to the much more subtle “interior” changes occurring in our consciousness.  Continuing our climb up the rungs of the diamond ladder, we are introduced to the landscape of mysticism, a topography whose several regions are each characterized by the mastery of a different psychological capacity.

    Yoga gives us an interior ladder in the form of the subtle body that is comprised of the chakras, each of which opens onto a distinctly different emotional realm.  In this work our “feeling function” becomes highly differentiated.  Tibetan mandala meditation disciplines our imaginative capacity, as we bring the heavenly palace of copulating gods and goddesses into being.  By cultivating emptiness, we pare away our attachments to the memories that have been holding us back and the aspirations that narrow our future so that we can dwell in the present moment, without the props of doctrine and method.

    Passing beyond our personal self, we are introduced to the divine oneness of the cosmos, pulsing between accomplished union and the vision of that with which we are united.  We return from such ecstasy to live our temporal lives on two planes simultaneously as spiritual wayfarers.

    John Ryan Haule holds a doctorate in religious studies from Temple University. He is a Jungian analyst trained in Zurich and is a faculty member of the C.G. Jung Institute-Boston.

    Tantra & Erotic Trance
    ISBN 978-0-9776076-9-3
    9.25 x 7.5 x .75
    Est. 225 pages
    Index, Bibliography
    Publication Date November 15, 2012


    Fisher King Press publishes an eclectic mix of worthy books including 
    Jungian Psychological Perspectives, Cutting-Edge Fiction, Poetry, 
    and a growing list of alternative titles. 

    Friday, July 13, 2012

    Bluefire Reader

    Unlike many eBook retailers-including Google, Apple, Kindle - who are limited to particular geographical markets, Fisher King Press eBooks can be purchased and read anywhere in the world.

    To read FKP eBook editions on your computer:
    1. Create an Adobe Account.
    2. Then download the FREE Adobe Digital Editions software and register the software using your Adobe ID. (Once registered with Adobe, your email address will become your Adobe ID.)
    To read FKP eBook editions on your iPad or Android Tablet:
    1. Create an Adobe Account.
    2. Then download the FREE Bluefire Reading App to your iPad or Android Tablet and link the Bluefire app to your Adobe ID. (Once registered with Adobe, your email address will become your Adobe ID.)

    Recap:

    Fisher King Press publishes an eclectic mix of worthy books including 
    Jungian Psychological Perspectives, Cutting-Edge Fiction, Poetry, 
    and a growing list of alternative titles. 

    Wednesday, July 11, 2012

    Daimon Verlag and Pramila Bennett

    Just Published

    Montreal 2010 
    Facing Multiplicity: 
    Psyche, Nature, Culture

    Edited by Pramila Bennett

    illustrated, 240 pages in print + 1789 pages on CD (included with book, not available separately) ISBN 978‑3‑85630‑744‑8, $ 41 / Sfr 35 / Ä30

    Order directly from the Publisher: Daimon Verlag

    Jungian analysts from all over the world gathered in Montreal from August 22 to 27, 2010 for the 18th Triannual Congress of the International Association for Analytical Psychology (I.A.A.P.). The 11 plenary presentations and 100 break-out sessions attest to the complex dynamics and dilemmas facing us in present-day culture. The Pre-Congress Workshop on Movement as Active Imagination papers are included, as are the opening address of Joe Cambray and farewell address of Hester Solomon.

    From the Contents:

    • Jacques Languirand: From Einstein’s God to the God of the Amerindians
    • Denise Ramos: Cultural Complex and the Elaboration of Trauma from Slavery
    • Christian Roesler: A Revision of Jung’s Theory of Archetypes in light of Contemporary Research
    • Guy Corneau: Cancer: Facing Multiplicity within Oneself
    • Marta Tibaldi: Clouds in the Sky Still Allow a Glimpse of the Moon: Cancer Resilience and Creativity
    • Astrid Berg, Tristan Troudart, Tawiq Salman: What could be Jungian About Human Rights Work?
    • Bou-Yong Rhi: Like Lao Zi’s Stream of Water: Implications for Therapeutic Attitudes
    • Linda Carter, Jean Knox, Marcus West, Joseph McFadden: The Alchemy of Attachment: Trauma, Fragmentation and Transformation in the Analytic Relationship
    • Sonu Shamdasani, Nancy Furlotti, Judith Harris & John Peck: Jung after The Red Book
    Paperback: 240 pages
    Publisher: Daimon; Pap/Com edition (April 30, 2012)
    Language: English
    ISBN-10: 3856307443
    ISBN-13: 978-3856307448


    Fisher King Press publishes an eclectic mix of worthy books including 
    Jungian Psychological Perspectives, Cutting-Edge Fiction, Poetry, 
    and a growing list of alternative titles.