Friday, April 17, 2020

Memory of Mother

Saturday May 9th, 2015

Spent some time with Nicole, Ella and Big little CJ (Christian) this afternoon. I took them to Van Wagner’s beach in Stoney Creek where we spent some good time, walking on the sand, skipping stones, photographing birds and each other, taking selfies then off to the ice cream parlor for some, black cherry, chocolate and cookies ice cream.

I packed some blankets and healthy snacks but never got around to it because—we all wanted ice cream!

This little outing drained me, but I drummed-up enough strength to go for a 5 mile walk to Bayfront. I purposely left my camera at home. Took a shower when I got back and convinced Sean to take me to Ola Bakery downstairs for an Americano and something sweet. I didn’t have time for coffee this morning and I feel a little sluggish and a bit of a headache.

Taking a 20-minute nap was my plan when we got back to the apartment. Immediately after I laid in bed, something shifted. Memories of my mother came pouring in—so were my tears. I long to be embraced by Mother. I long to have a conversation with her—feel her close to me—touch her beautiful skin—inhale her scent and tell her how much I miss and love her. Even as I write this piece, my tears flow—unstoppable.  The lump in my throat won’t go away and I wallow in memories and the feeling of emptiness remain.

Suddenly, I was being pulled out of bed by some unexplainable energy. Grabbed my purse and keys—ready to be led by this energy—a visit to the cemetery! Unfortunately, Sean had made plans with his long time friends. He noticed my tears. I tell him why. Although he was willing to let me have the car, I wasn’t about to spoil his plans with friends who he rarely spend time with. Tomorrow, on Mother’s Day, I’ll make the drive. My energy was on overdrive—this poem is the result of that creative energy wanting to be expressed.


Spontaneous Childhood Memory on Mother’s Day

she knew he would be home soon
from where, she had a good idea—
all day and into the evening
she’s been reaching into
a hiding spot inside the rice bin
where she stashed her bottle
of whiskey, taking swigs
as if an elixir that would
wash away the feeling—
of pain—anxiety—the fear
of what might come
when he gets home—tired and drunk

or is it what comes after
that she tries to numb
that if she took swigs after swigs
of whiskey, she will
develop thick skin

his words whips like barbed wire
his hands quick to throw slaps
punches and hair pulling
she begs him to stop
but he doesn’t hear her
he whips, he grabs, he slaps
until she’s down
on the ground

a little girl cowers in the
corner of one room—helpless
hands clasps on both ears
she breathes deeply
whispers to no one in particular
she promises to be good
promises to be different
to her children when she’s
grown up with her own
       just make this go away

she’s the little girl
who wanted to be good
the perfect little girl
who was favored
the little girl who sang
to her daddy during school recess
the little girl who pulled her daddy’s
whiskers until he fell asleep
          he was mellow—

she’s the little girl who
wanted to please everybody
the little girl who
bears the weight
of what seems like
the whole world

she’s grown up now
but still remembers
she’s stronger, loving, caring
she’s not perfect but
there's one thin she has—
               
                     herself!

                              that’s how she wants to be

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

'A Jungian Life' by Thomas B. Kirsch—New Publication by Fisher King Press

"Tom Kirsch is one of the core creators of the Jungian world as we find it today. His knowledge of the history, the issues and the personalities is second to none. We knew that Kirsch is kind, empathic, related—and responsible for a raft of interesting publications. Maybe we—or some of us—did not know how frank, penetrating, controversial, and insightful an observer of professional political process he is. At times, the book takes no prisoners. Every Jungian analyst, candidate and scholar simply must read this book. But the way in Kirsch situates his first-person narratives against the backdrop of world politics—in Russia, China, South Africa, and Latin America, for example—makes this memoir worthy of serious attention from non-Jungian thinkers and practitioners." —Andrew Samuels, Professor of Analytical Psychology, University of Essex

"Tom Kirsch's unique life as a Jungian spans much of the history of analytical psychology which he both witnessed first hand and helped shape. His gifts of seasoned insight, finely tuned feeling and a keen eye for specific historic detail makes this volume a rare and significant contribution." — Tom Singer, M.D., Jungian analyst, editor of The Cultural Complex

"In our age of sophisticated internet technology, where communications tend to brevity and lack literary sophistication, Tom Kirsch’s memoir, A Jungian Life, is a breath of fresh air, and a precious gem for the Jungian community. Kirsch traces with mastery and sensitivity his life as a Jungian analyst from family origins close to Jung developing into a lively lacework of connections within the Jungian world from both well-established Societies to the burgeoning of new groups across the world interested in Jungian psychology. He balances well the relationship between the personal and the professional offering the reader thought-provoking opportunities to read between the lines for common themes including the shadow of our theoretical controversies and the personal disagreements within our profession. It is a moving, revealing and well-written memoir and I recommend it highly to all those who wish to know more about our ancestors and their effects on the development of the theory and practice of Jungian psychology." —Jan Wiener, Director of Training, Society of Analytical Psychology, London and Vice-President, IAAP 2010-2013

From conception until the present, C.G. Jung, his ideas, and analytical psychology itself have been a central thread of Thomas B. Kirsch’s life. His parents, James and Hilde Kirsch, were in analysis with C.G, Jung when he was born, and he was imaged to be the product of a successful analysis. At an early age, Dr. Kirsch was introduced to many of the first-generation analysts who surrounded C.G. Jung, and over time became acquainted with them. Later, in his roles with the IAAP, he gained a broad knowledge of the developments in analytical psychology, and through both his early family history and in his later professional life, Dr. Kirsch worked closely with many analysts who were integral in forming the foundations of analytical psychology.

Dr. Kirsch graduated from Yale Medical School in 1961, did his residency in psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford University, and then spent two years with the National Institute of Mental Health in San Francisco. He completed his Jungian training at the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco in 1968. In 1976 Dr. Kirsch became president of the Jung institute in San Francisco, and in 1977 he was elected second vice president of the International Association for Analytical Psychology, or IAAP, the professional organization of Jungian analysts around the world. As vice president and then president of the IAAP for eighteen years, he traveled the world and was able to meet Jungian analysts from many different countries. This position allowed him to serve a missionary function of sorts in new areas like China, South Africa, Mexico, Russia, and other former Soviet Eastern Bloc countries. In A Jungian Life, Thomas B. Kirsch reflects upon his entire existence which has been intimately involved with C.G. Jung and analytical psychology.


CONTENTS:
Chapter 1 - Early Beginnings
Chapter 2 - Growing Up in Los Angeles
Chapter 3 - Crossing the Great Water
Chapter 4 - Medical School and Internship: No Man’s Land
Chapter 5 - Psychiatric Residency and National Institute of Mental Health
Chapter 6 - Jungian Training
Chapter 7 - Beginning Private Practice
Chapter 8 - Early Relationship to the IAAP
Chapter 9 - IAAP Presidency, 1989 – 1992
Chapter 10 - IAAP Presidency, Second Term 1992 – 1995
Chapter 11 - Post-IAAP Presidency, 1995 – 2003
Chapter 12 - The Jungians
Chapter 13 - History Conferences
Chapter 14 - New Directions
Chapter 15 - The Red Book
Chapter 16 - Relationship to my Parents during my Adult Years
Chapter 17 - Conclusion
Appendix A - Joseph L. Henderson
Appendix B - James Hillman
Appendix C - Adolf Guggenb├╝hl-Craig
Appendix D - Joseph B. Wheelwright
Appendix E - C.A. Meier
Appendix F - John Weir Perry

About the Author
Thomas B. Kirsch is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Palo Alto, California. He was president of the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco from 1976 – 1978, served on the executive committee of the International Association for Analytical Psychology from 1977 – 1995, and was IAAP president from 1989 – 1995. Dr. Kirsch was the co-editor of the Jungian Section of the International Encyclopedia of Psychoanalysis, Psychiatry, and Neurology, 1977, as well as editor of the Jungian section of the three volume International Dictionary of Psychoanalysis edited by Alain de Mijolla, 2005. He is the author of The Jungians: A Comparative and Historical Perspective, Consulting Editor to the Correspondence between his father, James Kirsch and C.G. Jung, 2011, as well as many published chapters in books, articles in scientific journals, and book reviews. In 2013 he co-edited with George Hogenson a book of papers on Jung’s Red Book. For more information on Dr. Kirsch, see his website at www.jungians.com.

Product Details
Title: A Jungian Life
Author: Thomas B. Kirsch
Publication Date: Dec 1, 2014
Paperback: 224 pages (Large Page Format 9.25" x 7.5")
Edition: 1st edition
Publisher: Fisher King Press
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1771690240
ISBN-13: 978-1771690249

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Sea Glass Reading and Book Signing

Sunday, November 02, 2014
3:00PM - 05:00PM

Location: C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles,
Lecture Room

No fee. Light refreshments will be served.

Presented by Gilda Frantz, M.A.

For the occasion of the publication of her book Sea Glass: A Jungian Analyst’s Exploration of Suffering and Individuation, we are honored to welcome Gilda Frantz for a reading and book signing. Sea Glass explores experiences many of us encounter in the course of a lifetime, including those of early childhood. As we mature we can begin to become aware that suffering, when made conscious, can lead us on a path toward higher consciousness, toward the experience of wholeness or individuation. The examples related in this book are told as a storyteller might and include the all-too-human experiences of loneliness, loss, shame, abandonment, aging, disenfranchisement, working with dreams, dealing with the opposites, striving to find one’s creativity, and relationship issues.

Gilda Frantz, M.A., is a Jungian analyst who practices in Santa Monica. She is an Emerita Board Member of the Philemon Foundation. Past President of the C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles, she has lectured internationally, served on many Jung Institute Boards, and is Founding Editor and co-editor in Chief of the journal Psychological Perspectives. Her main areas of interest have been the creative process and active imagination. She is the author of Sea Glass: A Jungian Analyst's Exploration of Suffering and Individuation. She is in her late 80's and this is her first book although she has been writing all of her life.

Note: Please call (310) 556-1193 ext. 221 or send email to administration@junginla.org for more information about registering for this event.

by Gilda Frantz
ISBN: 978-1771690201
order from: Amazon.com  or  Fisher King Press
Phone orders welcomed
Credit Cards Accepted
in Canada and the US call
1-800-228-9316

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Feathered Ladder—Poetry Reading


WHAT:    A reading from my new book Feathered Ladder, a collection with Dennis Patrick Slattery
WHEN:    Sunday, October 5th, 3 pm until 5 pm
WHERE:  The Steynberg Gallery in San Luis Obispo, 1531 Monterey Street, across from Frank's
WITH:      Laura Moll, environmental sculptor
                David Stroup, large format photographs
                Craig Kincaid, acoustic music

I have been writing poetry for the last 40 years, or rather, it writes itself through me.  The primary themes of my work are relationship, archaic wisdom…the essentials of being an enlightened human, myth, legend, magic, intimacy, and suchness.  I've been told at different times that "Your work  is sublime", or alternatively, "Your work is perverse", the problem for me is, I don't know which is which!

Regarding the alchemical mixing of photography and poetry: odd, isn’t it, that although we do not perceive a black and white world, black and white photography is thought to be more “real” than color photography.  Perhaps it better intuits a profound truth, that of duality:  black/white, light/dark, boiling/freezing, love/hate, life/death.

Poetry is real in the same sense.  Poets do not look directly at the face of God, but we describe what is ultimately real, the underlayment of duality which is harmony and balance.  We point to mystery, to the irrational experience which yields the comfort of understanding.

Poetry is a perfumed wasp, an obsidian kimono, a feathered ladder.

Product Details:
Feathered Ladder: Selected Poems 
Authors: Dennis Patrick Slattery and Brian Landis
Paperback: 230 pages
Publisher: il piccolo editions; 1st edition (March 21, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN 10: 1771690127
ISBN 13: 9781771690126

Monday, September 15, 2014

Thomas B. Kirsch in A Jungian Life

From conception until the present, C.G. Jung, his ideas, and analytical psychology itself have been a central thread of Thomas B. Kirsch’s life. His parents, James and Hilde Kirsch, were in analysis with C.G, Jung when he was born, and he was imaged to be the product of a successful analysis. At an early age, Dr. Kirsch was introduced to many of the first-generation analysts who surrounded C.G. Jung, and over time became acquainted with them. Later, in his roles with the IAAP, he gained a broad knowledge of the developments in analytical psychology, and through both his early family history and in his later professional life, Dr. Kirsch worked closely with many analysts who were integral in forming the foundations of analytical psychology.

Dr. Kirsch graduated from Yale Medical School in 1961, did his residency in psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford University, and then spent two years with the National Institute of Mental Health in San Francisco. He completed his Jungian training at the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco in 1968. In 1976 Dr. Kirsch became president of the Jung institute in San Francisco, and in 1977 he was elected second vice president of the International Association for Analytical Psychology, or IAAP, the professional organization of Jungian analysts around the world. As vice president and then president of the IAAP for eighteen years, he traveled the world and was able to meet Jungian analysts from many different countries. This position allowed him to serve a missionary function of sorts in new areas like China, South Africa, Mexico, Russia, and other former Soviet Eastern Bloc countries. In A Jungian Life, Thomas B. Kirsch reflects upon his entire existence which has been intimately involved with C.G. Jung and analytical psychology.


CONTENTS:
Chapter 1 - Early Beginnings
Chapter 2 - Growing Up in Los Angeles
Chapter 3 - Crossing the Great Water
Chapter 4 - Medical School and Internship: No Man’s Land
Chapter 5 - Psychiatric Residency and National Institute of Mental Health
Chapter 6 - Jungian Training
Chapter 7 - Beginning Private Practice
Chapter 8 - Early Relationship to the IAAP
Chapter 9 - IAAP Presidency, 1989 – 1992
Chapter 10 - IAAP Presidency, Second Term 1992 – 1995
Chapter 11 - Post-IAAP Presidency, 1995 – 2003
Chapter 12 - The Jungians
Chapter 13 - History Conferences
Chapter 14 - New Directions
Chapter 15 - The Red Book
Chapter 16 - Relationship to my Parents during my Adult Years
Chapter 17 - Conclusion
Appendix A - Joseph L. Henderson
Appendix B - James Hillman
Appendix C - Adolf Guggenb├╝hl-Craig
Appendix D - Joseph B. Wheelwright
Appendix E - C.A. Meier
Appendix F - John Weir Perry

About the Author
Thomas B. Kirsch is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Palo Alto, California. He was president of the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco from 1976 – 1978, served on the executive committee of the International Association for Analytical Psychology from 1977 – 1995, and was IAAP president from 1989 – 1995. Dr. Kirsch was the co-editor of the Jungian Section of the International Encyclopedia of Psychoanalysis, Psychiatry, and Neurology, 1977, as well as editor of the Jungian section of the three volume International Dictionary of Psychoanalysis edited by Alain de Mijolla, 2005. He is the author of The Jungians: A Comparative and Historical Perspective, Consulting Editor to the Correspondence between his father, James Kirsch and C.G. Jung, 2011, as well as many published chapters in books, articles in scientific journals, and book reviews. In 2013 he co-edited with George Hogenson a book of papers on Jung’s Red Book. For more information on Dr. Kirsch, see his website at www.jungians.com.

Product Details
Title: A Jungian Life
Author: Thomas B. Kirsch
Publication Date: Dec 1, 2014
Paperback: 224 pages (Large Page Format 9.25" x 7.5")
Edition: 1st edition
Publisher: Fisher King Press
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1771690240
ISBN-13: 978-1771690249

Monday, September 8, 2014

Earth Angel and the Tohu Bohu

Jungian Analyst Naomi Ruth Lowinsky to Present Lecture & Workshop this September

“At times I feel as if I am spread out all over the landscape…and am myself living in every tree, in the splashing of the waves, in the clouds and the animals that come and go, in the procession of the seasons.”
    ~ C.G. Jung

Lecture

Naomi Ruth Lowinksy
Earth Angel and the Tohu Bohu
Date: 9/19/2014
Time: 7 to 9 p.m.
Cost: $25 for members / $30 for non-members
CEUs: 2 CEUs are available for Friday’s lecture (an additional $10)
Event Location: The First Unitarian Church of Cleveland
(21600 Shaker Blvd., Shaker Heights, Ohio 44122)
Lecture Description:
Earth is our Home, our Mother, our Rock of Ages, our Tree of Life, our Beloved – the source of all of our blessings. But in our restless quest for new worlds and treasure we exploit and abuse our Earth. We forget She is alive, forget She has a soul. How do we reckon our human nature with Nature? How do we suffer our grief, guilt and fear about what we have wrought without becoming paralyzed? Naomi Ruth Lowinsky will speak – in stories and poems – of her own struggle to respond to Earth Angel and the Rising Tides.

Workshop

Writing the Spirit of Place
Date: 9/20/2014
Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Cost: $85 for members / $95 for non-members
CEUs: 4.5 CEUs are available for Saturday’s Workshop (an additional $25)
Event Location: The First Unitarian Church of Cleveland
(21600 Shaker Blvd., Shaker Heights, Ohio 44122)
Workshop Description:
We’ve turned our Beloved Earth into a fury. Weather is Her language. She bellows at us in hurricanes, tsunamis, warming oceans, melting glaciers, tornados and fires. How do we rebuild our erotic relationship with Earth, our reverence, our awe? In this daylong workshop, we will write our way back to our primordial love of Earth, back to the places that have shaped us as dwellers and as pilgrims – our own earthly inheritance. Ideal for those who write and those who want to write. Bring a notebook and pen.

About Lowinsky:
Naomi Ruth Lowinsky is an analyst member of the San Francisco C.G. Jung Institute, a frequent contributor to and poetry editor of Psychological Perspectives, and a widely published poet. She is the co-editor, with Patricia Damery, of the essay collection: Marked by Fire: Stories of the Jungian Way. Her memoir about the creative process is called The Sister from Below: When the Muse Gets Her Way. Lowinsky’s latest poetry collection, The Faust Woman Poems, includes many poems about our endangered ecology. She is one of several poets whose environmental poetry is featured in the anthology, The Book of Now: Poetry for the Rising Tide

Friday, September 5, 2014

A Lively Discussion with Nancy Furlotti, Kathryn Madden and Erel Shalit

First Tuesday Lunch Forums

Informal gatherings are scheduled the first Tuesday of each month. An analyst or other specialist guides discussion on issues that touch our lives — aging, homelessness, current movies, finding balance in our lives, journal writing, and others. Bring a brown bag lunch — coffee, tea and cookies will be provided. No reservations required, suggested contribution fee of $2.00. All are welcome.

Location:
C. G. Jung Center
28 East 39th Street
New York City
Time: 12:30 to 1:30 pm (unless otherwise noted).
For more information, call 212-697-6430, or email 
info@cgjungny.org


Upcoming Tuesday Lunch Forums


Tuesday, October 7th, 2014
12:30 – 2:30 pm


A lively discussion with Nancy Furlotti, Kathryn Madden and Erel Shalit. Join us in celebrating the publication of this important book.

The Dream and its Amplification unveils the language of the psyche that speaks to us in our dreams. We all dream at least 4–6 times each night yet remember very few. Those that rise to the surface of our conscious awareness beckon to be understood, like a letter addressed to us that arrives by post. Why would we not open it? The difficulty is in understanding what the dream symbols and images mean.

Through amplification, C.G. Jung formulated a method of unveiling the deeper meaning of symbolic images. This becomes particularly important when the image does not carry a personal meaning or significance and is not part of a person’s everyday life.

Erel Shalit, Ph.D.,is a Jungian psychoanalyst in Tel Aviv, Israel. He is past President of the Israel Society of Analytical Psychology. He is Founding Director of the Jungian Analytical Psychotherapy Program at Bar Ilan University, and past Director of the Shamai Davidson Clinic, at the Shalvata Psychiatric Centre in Israel. His books include The Cycle of Life: Themes and Tales of the Journey; Requiem: A Tale of Exile and Return; and Enemy, Cripple & Beggar: Shadows in the Hero's Path. Entries, chapters and articles of his appear in several books and journals. He wrote the chapter on Jerusalem in Tom Singer (ed.), Psyche and the City, and "Silence is the Center of Feeling" appeared in Rob and Janet Henderson, Living with Jung: "Enterviews" with Jungian Analysts. For more information about Dr. Shalit's work and publications, see www.erelshalit.com and www.eshalit.com.

Nancy Swift Furlotti, Ph.D.,is a Jungian Analyst in California and Colorado. She is a past president of the C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles and the Philemon Foundation. As an active member of the IRSJA and the C.G. Jung Institute of Colorado, Nancy is also Chair of the Film Archive Committee that oversees the Remembering Jung Video Series and the films, A Matter of Heart and The World Within. She is a longstanding board member of ARAS. Her publications include "The Archetypal Drama in Puccini’s Opera Madam Butterfly", "Tracing a Red Thread: Synchronicity and Jung's Red Book" (Psychological Perspectives), "Angels and Idols: Los Angeles, A City of Contrasts," in Tom Singer (ed.) Psyche and the City. Her psychological amplification of the Maya Popol Vuh creation myth is forthcoming in 2014. Her interests include Mesoamerican mythology, initiation rites, and our relationship to nature.

Kathryn Madden, Ph.D.,is a Licensed Psychoanalyst of Jungian and psychodynamic focus in private practice in NYC. For ten years, she has served as the Editor in Chief of Quadrant: The Journal of the C.G. Jung Foundation. Kathryn is on the Adjunct Faculty of Pacifica Graduate Institute and is a Lecturer at Union Theological Seminary at Columbia University. In addition to her contribution to The Dream and its Amplification, her publications include Dark Light of the Soul, the Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion, which she co-edited with Stanton Marlan and David Leeming and numerous articles. She guest lectures and offers speaking engagements in the US and abroad.

Monday, August 4, 2014

Join Pacifica for a Writer's Workshop with Dennis Patrick Slattery

Writing Our Memories, Riting Our Myth, Righting Our Lives

A Writing Retreat

with Dennis Patrick Slattery | August 29–31, 2014

Perhaps each of us is an amalgam of several inflections: a life lived, a life remembered, and a life storied. In this trinity, memory mingles with myth in a way that the ancient Greeks called mimesis. By that they meant that imitation is something all human beings love to engage and enact, from an infant’s delight in the repetition of a simple game, to our own imagination being moved to insight by a classic work of literature, art, music or another’s narrative. Might imitation be at the heart of our myth-making impulse so, as literary theorist Louise Cowan, has written, we poetically transform the past into memory. We might think about writing as an intimate and forceful mode of remembering what we had not sufficiently shaped into a coherent form so that our lives in their entirety continue to desire both coherence and meaning.

In this writing retreat we will draw on our own re-membered life events and give them a form, in some instances for the first time, primarily through writing, but also through body movement and painting images, as well as responding to and writing poetry. In addition, we will explore brief passages from the first person narratives of discovery, Dante’s Divine Comedy and Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick, to test how mimesis offers us an inroad to understanding on a profound level what has not been sculpted into coherence before.

Click Here for Additional Information or Registration

By offering the soul various venues in which to imagine, we will both discover and create further structures of our narrative identity and its patterned presence within the larger collective myth that surrounds us. We will also explore those moments in our lives that have remained to date unlived and where we have refused the call to adventure, said “no” to life, preferred to be “called later” to its invitations and chosen to forget what may now be insisting on being re-membered.

Please leave your laptop at home and bring your journal and pen to write in cursive. Some of the writing meditations will be used from the book, Riting Myth, Mythic Writing: Plotting Your Personal Story by Dennis Patrick Slattery. Others will emerge from the two classics mentioned above as well as the stories embedded in our bodies that body movement will allow to have full expression. What will emerge in this retreat is a greater awareness of each of our own narrative truths.

PROGRAM DATES:

Friday, August 29
7:00 pm-9:00 pm

Saturday, August 30
9:00 am-5:00 pm

Sunday, August 31
9:00 am-12:00 pm

Workshop will be held at Pacifica’s Ladera Lane Campus.

Accommodations are available on campus and at the Best Western Carpinteria Inn.

TUITION:

$380 General Admission

$330 Special Admission
Full-Time Students, Pacifica Alumni, and Seniors

$300 Active Pacifica Students

Meals included Friday dinner; Saturdaybreakfast, lunch, and dinner; and Sundaybreakfast and lunch; extra meals available are Friday breakfast ($13) and lunch ($19).

SPECIAL OFFER:

Attend the Friday, August 29 Pacifica Experience: A One-Day Introduction to Pacifica’s Degree Programs and admission is reduced to $190.

Dennis Patrick Slattery, Ph.D., is core faculty in the Mythological Studies Program at Pacifica Graduate Institute, where he has taught for 18 years. He is the author, co-author, editor or co-editor of 19 published volumes, including four volumes of poetry. His poems have appeared in newspapers, magazines, journals and online publications in the United States and elsewhere. His most recent book is Riting Myth, Mythic Writing: Plotting Your Personal Story. For more information, visit dennispslattery.com.


Monday, July 21, 2014

Fisher King Press Announces Another Forthcoming Jungian Publication

With great pleasure, Fisher King Press announces another forthcoming Jungian publication:

Sea Glass: A Jungian Analyst's Exploration of Individuation and Suffering 

by Gilda Frantz

Sea Glass: A Jungian Analyst’s Exploration of Suffering and Individuation explores experiences many of us encounter in the course of a lifetime, including those of early childhood. As we mature we can begin to become aware that suffering, when made conscious, can lead us on a path toward higher consciousness, toward the experience of wholeness or individuation. The examples related in this book are told as a storyteller might and include the all-too-human experiences of loneliness, loss, shame, abandonment, aging, disenfranchisement, working with dreams, dealing with the opposites, striving to find one’s creativity, and relationship issues.


CONTENTS

Part 1 - Archetypal Suffering
  • The Greyhound Path to Individuation
  • Growing Up Poor in Los Angeles
  • Birth’s Cruel Secret: “I Am My Own Lost Mother to My Own Sad Child”
  • On the Meaning of Loneliness
  • Image and Imagination; Wounding and Healing
Part 2 - Mysterious Workings of the Psyche
  • Dreams and Sudden Death
  • Creativity and Inspiration: An interview with Stephen Martin
  • Fellini Satryicon
  • Shame
Part 3 - Nature
  • Carrying the Opposites within Oneself
  • Redemption
Part 4 - Psychological and Spiritual Development
  • The Flowering Wood: An Exploration of Individuation and the Integration of the Feminine Principle
  • Relativity and Relationship
  • Reflections on Disenfranchisement
Part 5 - Aging 
  • Being Ageless: The Very Soul of Beauty
  • Body and Soul
  • Jung, Aging, and Individuation
Part 6 - Our Jungian Ancestors
  • I’ll See You in My Dreams
  • Spiritual Journeys
About the Author
Gilda Frantz is the co-editor-in-chief of Psychological Perspectives, a journal of Jungian thought of interest to anyone in search of self-understanding. She is one of the original editors of this journal, founded in 1970. For three years she served as president of the C. G. Jung Institute in Los Angeles. Mrs. Frantz is a Director Emerita of the board of the Philemon Foundation, having served throughout the publication period of Jung’s Red Book. She practices in Santa Monica, California.

Product Details
Paperback
240 pages (estimate)
First Edition
Publisher: Fisher King Press
Publication Date: November 1, 2014
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1771690208
ISBN-13: 978-1771690201

Fisher King Press publishes an eclectic mix of worthy books including 
Jungian Psychological Perspectives, Cutting-Edge Fiction, Poetry, 
and a growing list of alternative titles. 

Friday, July 11, 2014

The New School For Analytical Psychology Presents:

FRACTURES IN THE MIRROR

Men, Narcissism, & Love Seminar in Seattle - Sept 2014

A Three Part Seminar Series on Men, Narcissism, & Love based onEros and the Shattering Gaze: Transcending Narcissism

Beginning Sept 26, 2014 at the Talaris Conference Center in Seattle

With Kenneth Kimmel, Jungian Psychoanalyst

These three seminars reveal a culturally and historically embedded narcisissm in modern men that, in its most malignant forms, perpetrates great harm, not only to their own core integrity, but to the wives, daughters, sons, and partners who have loved them.

The instructor employs rich storytelling to amplify his teaching–-the medium of modern film, art slides, music, extended clinical case presentations, mythology, Biblical stories, the Arthurian tales of tragic love, classic literature, Gothic horror, and a weaving together of inter-texts from diverse psychoanalytic and philosophical schools of thought. They all bring a wealth of perspectives and meaning to bear upon the many faces of narcissism and the single act that pierces its embeddedness.

This broad and multi-dimensional view sharpens our clinical understanding of this shattering and renewing process--one that leads in fortunate cases to the awakening of men’s capacity to love. . . .

Beginning Friday night, September 26.

For registration information, please click here. www.nsanpsy.com/eros-seminar

Saturday, July 5, 2014

The Orphan: A Journey to Wholeness

Press Release - Just Published by Fisher King Press

The Orphan: A Journey to Wholeness
by Audrey Punnett

"This awesome book on the orphan, its inner, outer, and symbolic meaning, is a deep and thorough investigation into the feeling of being alone in the world. The core of this archetype gives rise to our potential to search for meaning and wholeness as does all our suffering, and – if we stay with it – it becomes our teacher. Punnett’s book is a must for all of us and reading it grants us a deeply rewarding experience."
—Kathrin Asper, PhD, author of The Abandoned Child Within

"This well-focused meditation demonstrates that the archetype of the orphan is always alive in us, even if we try to devalue and marginalize it as a symbol we can safely reject along with the children we ask to carry it. Audrey Punnett has illuminated how central this neglected mythologem is to what our souls want therapists, social workers, and clergy to recognize. Her book makes a psychological home for aloneness itself—a rare and touching achievement."
—John Beebe, MD, author of Integrity in Depth

"At the very end of his biography C.G. Jung wrote, “When Lao-tzu says: ‘All are clear, I alone am clouded,’ he is expressing what I now feel in advanced old age.” This feeling of seclusion is why he, at the age of 75, engraved the quotations from alchemy about the orphan on his stone at Bollingen. It is this wisdom that is behind the archetype of the orphan if we can only accept it. This is, to me, the most precious message of Audrey Punnett’s book on the orphan."
—Andreas Schweizer, PhD, author of The Sungod’s Journey through the Netherworld

The Orphan: A Journey to Wholeness addresses loneliness and the feeling of being alone in the world, two distinct characteristics that mark the life of an orphan. Regardless if we have grown up with or without parents, we are all too likely to meet such experiences in ourselves and in our daily encounters with others. With numerous case examples, Dr. Punnett describes how loneliness and the feeling of being alone tend to be repeated in later relationships and may eventually lead to states of anxiety and depression. The main purpose of this book is not to just stay within the context of the literal orphan, but also to explore its symbolic dimensions in order to provide meaning to the diverse experiences of feeling alone in the world. In accepting the orphan within, we begin to take responsibility for our own unique life journey, a privileged journey in which one can at some point in time say with pride, I am an orphan.

Audrey Punnett, PhD, is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute, Zurich with diplomas in both Child/Adolescent and Adult Analytical Psychology. She is an Associate Clinical Professor, Psychiatry, the University of California San Francisco – Fresno; Adjunct Professor, Alliant International University; Registered Play Therapist – Supervisor, and Certified Sandplay Therapist – Teacher, ISST & STA, past President of the Board of Trustees. She is a member of AGAP, serving on the Board, and the CGJI-SF, past Chair of the Infant, Child & Adolescent Training Committee (iCAT). She has lectured and given workshops on the orphan in Europe, New Zealand, Taiwan, Canada and the USA, and published in peer reviewed Journals. Dr. Punnett maintains a private practice in Fresno, California.

Product Details:
The Orphan: A Journey to Wholeness 
by Audrey Punnett
Paperback edition
Price $27.50
180 pages, Index, Bibliography
Publisher: Fisher King Press; 1st edition
Publication Date: June 21, 2014
Language: English
ISBN-10: 177169016X
ISBN-13: 978-1771690164
Fisher King Press publishes an eclectic mix of worthy books including 
Jungian Psychological Perspectives, Cutting-Edge Fiction, Poetry, 
and a growing list of alternative titles. 

Monday, May 19, 2014

Tom Kelly's praise for Shared Realities: Participation Mystique and Beyond

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Shared Realities: Participation Mystique and Beyond, edited by Mark Winborn, brings together Jungian analysts and psychoanalysts from across the United States, the United Kingdom, and France. Jung’s concept of participation mystique is used as a starting point for an in depth exploration of ‘shared realities’ in the analytic setting and beyond. The clinical, narrative, and theoretical discussions move through such related areas as: projective identification, negative coniunctio, reverie, intersubjectivity, the interactive field, phenomenology, neuroscience, the transferential chimera, shamanism, shared reality of place, borderland consciousness, and mystical participation. This unique collection of essays bridges theoretical orientations and includes some of the most original analytic writers of our time (approximately 270 pages). Available June 1st.

"Jung's use of the concept participation mystique has always struck me as among his most original ideas and I could vaguely intuit its relevance to many contemporary developments in psychoanalysis, from projective identification to intersubjectivity to the mysteries of transitional space. Now, thanks to the extraordinary essays in this book, one no longer has to "intuit" this relevance. It is spelled out in beautiful detail by writers with expertise in many facets of our field. The breadth of these essays is truly extraordinary. Reading them has enriched both my personal and professional life. I highly recommend this book."
Donald Kalsched, Ph.D. author of The Inner World of Trauma: Archetypal Defenses of the Personal Spirit (Routledge, 1996) and Trauma and the Soul: A Psycho-spiritual Approach to Human Development and its Interruption (Routledge, 2013).
* * * * *
"The concept of 'participation mystique' is one that is often considered a somewhat arcane notion disparagingly equated with an unconscious, undifferentiated or 'primitive' dynamic. This collection of outstanding articles from Jungian analysts of different theoretical perspectives and analysts from different schools of depth psychology redeems this concept and locates it as central to depth work, regardless of one’s theoretical orientation. What may seem like an ethereal notion becomes grounded when explored from the perspective of the clinical, the experiential and the theoretical. Linking participation mystique to the more clinical concepts of projective identification, unitary reality, empathy, the intersubjective field and the neurosciences and locating this dynamic in the field of the transference and counter-transference, brings this concept to life in a refreshingly clear and related manner. In addition, each author does so in a very personal manner. 
"This book provides the reader with a wonderful example of amplification of participation mystique, linking many diverse threads and fibers to form an image, which, while it reveals its depth and usefulness, nevertheless maintains its sense of mystery. This book is a true delight for anyone intrigued by those “moments of meeting,” moments of awe, when the ineffable becomes manifest, when we feel the shiver down our spine, be it in our work or in a moment of grace as we sit quietly in nature. Shared Realities offers nourishment for the clinician, for the intellect and, most importantly, for the soul. I highly recommend it!"
Tom Kelly - President, International Association for Analytical Psychology and Past-President, Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts.


Fisher King Press publishes an eclectic mix of worthy books including 
Jungian Psychological Perspectives, Cutting-Edge Fiction, Poetry, 
and a growing list of alternative titles. 
www.fisherkingpress.com

Thursday, April 17, 2014

A Celebration at Pacifica Graduate Institute Bookstore

On April 23, 2014 the Pacifica Graduate Institute Bookstore invites you to help celebrate three new poetry publications on Wednesday from 4:30-6:30 PM, at the Ladera Campus Lobby.

Poetry Readings & Book Signing - Introduction by Susan Rowland


Feathered Ladder: Selected Poems
by Dennis Patrick Slattery and Brian Landis

Feels Like Home Again: Collected Poems
by Joel Weishaus

Haiku for Aphrodite: Poems
by Evans Lansing Smith

Pacifica Graduate Institute’s Ladera Lane Campus
801 Ladera Lane
Santa Barbara, CA 93108
1-805-879-7327 - bookstore@pacifica.edu
Fisher King Press publishes an eclectic mix of worthy books including 
Jungian Psychological Perspectives,  Poetry, 
and a growing list of alternative titles.